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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
gallagher in washington, vice president and executive director of msnbc.com. that was general norman swa schwartzkopf you saw on your screen who passed away yesterday. i have a lasting memory of general schwartzkopf who served in the war in vietnam as well as leading gulf storm one. there was a woman from iowa. her name was peg mullen. she wrote a book about the death of her son, michael mullen. the name of the book was "friendly fire." norman schwartzkopf was the battalion commander. he was so approachable to peg mullen, so human in his relations with peg mullen, who sought to find out how her son was killed in vietnam. he died from friendly fire, which, you know obviously meant he was killed within the confines of his own unit by shrapnel from american weapons fired. it was so impressive to read about then a colonel later to become norm an schwartzkopf general "time" magazine's man of the year who was so human. just that clip we just showed right then compared to a lot of military officials who we see on tv. an actual human being would could say i hope i don't make a mistake. things li
of the sheriff. >> just broken. >> washington was -- washington barely ran for a second term because he was so tired of being criticized. adams was defeated. jefferson left under a huge cloud. truman is the modern example of every president who gets in trouble wants to be truman because it means history implicates you, right? one of the things that happened was watergate. and it took 30 years, maybe a little bit less, but truman -- remember that one-man show -- >> the merle miller one? >> the plain speaking -- but there was a one-man show that went on just as watergate was breaking. and truman had the great good fortune of having disliked richard nixon early and had a lot of quotations about it. and he suddenly, as faith in the public sector is falling in the early '70s, all the examples you're talking about with truman are looking better and better. a president who, as evan wrote about the wise men, he was the popular embodiment of an american willingness to project power and to stand guard over a really complicated dark world. >> by the way, during the mid'70s, also, even chicago, the band c
. host: that is a shot of the union station in weiss did, d.c. -- in washington, d.c.. we will take a look at politics and the year in foreign policy. we want to hear from you about your political hero. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/cspanwj. we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that journal@c-span.org. your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, facebook.com/cspan. a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll
in washington. it ended with the reelection of barack obama. if you could think of adjectives, what would they be to describe these seven years? >> interesting. challenging. sometimes totally frustrating. full of opportunities for the country. there were good times during these 12 years, laced together with some that were not so good. 9/11. the anthrax scare. there were also positive things. the election of barack obama i thought was a very positive statement for the country and moving forward in a way out of a fiscal of this. abyss.thi i could not have imagined a better time to have been here with all of the things that have happened. >> let me ask you to look back over those 12 years and ask what the high point was. >> when we could work together. maybe the single event that would and body that is the gang of 14. john mccain and i put together six other democrats and six other republicans to avoid what was then called the nuclear option, changing the rules, turning the senate into a smaller version of the house, where the rights of the minority caucus are ignored. consequently, we were
. up until then more from this morning's "washington journal" focus on domestic program cuts. >> host: domestic spending cuts is on the table for the fiscal cliff talks. two different perspectives for you here. isabel sawhill, brookings institution. brookings center on children and families. james capretta ethics and public policy center and visiting scholar at aei. let me begin with you. are these potential domestic cuts under sequestration devastating or manageable? >> guest: somewhere in between. not a good idea. they would be very deep cuts, you know, an 8% cut across the board is a very significant one-time cut for any program to sustain in immediate year period. so they're not a good idea. would it be the end of the world, no? >> host: what do you mean by that? >> guest: well, i mean there would be downsizing of a lot of services across the government in terms of the domestic accounts. so it would be fewer services being provided. there would be reduced federal employees. some grant programs would take a haircut of five, 10%. so there would be downsizing of the services provided
, a reporter described where we are right now as a situation of washington post own making. -- washington's own making. how did we get where we are right now? >> on the revenue side, you go back to the bush years. when they passed the bush tax cuts, for various procedural reasons, they wanted to shoehorn as much tax-cutting as they could into a 10-year period. because of the rules, they really went overboard, did much more in the way of tax cutting and we could afford. it was very apparent at the time that they did it. they sun-setted it all after 10 years. the same is true with the so- called sequester. across-the-board cuts of $1.20 trillion, focused on domestic spending, was put in place to try to provide leverage to the special committee that if it did not reach agreement, the sequester would drop and do something that nobody favors, an across-the-board cut. no distinctions, no prioritize nation. just to cut across the board. -- prioritization. just to cut across the board. >> going back to the bush years, what is congress's role in this? >> i vigorously and energetically opposed it. i said
negotiations between capitol hill and the white house. from today's washington journal, this is about an hour. fiscal cliff. joining us here is stan collender and douglas holtz- eaken. what is happening? what are the two talking about. guest: the nature of the tax increases, how much, and on the other side, what kind of entitlement reforms as the president willing to offer? that has been going back and forth for quite awhile now. there are talking about the same basic issues. host: one of the shore signs of action in washington, we have heard there is a possibility that they could come back after christmas. guest: i have been telling clients since september we were going over the cliff. i was not sure there was a sign it or coming back before christmas. this last-minute deal of some time, it could easily be approved -- the house and senate do not need to be here for this because it will not be the big, big deal. this is not the grand compromise they are talking about here there is not enough support to do the technical things. this could be a simple package they do at the last minute. host: e
of u.s. security agents. benghazi, tripoli and washington coordinated effectively with each other on the night of the attacks. the interagency response was timely and appropriate. but there was not enough time for u.s. military forces to have made a difference. having said that, it is not reasonable nor feasible to tether u.s. forces at the ready to respond to protect every high risk post in the world. we have found that there was no immediate tactical warning of the september 11 attacks. if there was a knowledge gap in the intelligence community's en understanding of extremist militias in benghazi -- in this context, increased violence .ailed to com we did not find that any individual u.s. government employee engaged in willful misconduct or knowingly ignored his or her responsibilities. we did conclude that certain state department bureau level senior officials in critical positions of authority and responsibility in washington demonstrate a lack of leadership and management ability a program for senior ranks and their responses to security concerns posed by the special mission.
well that in washington when you're talking about obligating a future congress to make cuts, that's not a deal. and that's the same hook that republicans have always gotten hung on in previous negotiations with democrats when rate increases are on the table. so republicans are saying, look, we'll go 37%. we may even talk about 39%, but we want to see real cuts that are right now, not something that you're going to obligate the congress of 2020 to do because that's not going to happen. >> but that's fine, michael, but that's not what they're saying. >> that is what they're saying. >> no, no, no. boehner wrote a letter in plain english, typed it out, no rate increases, period. not no rate increases -- >> come on. steve, like that means something? >> hold on. so he wrote that letter. the president said we're not going to move from 39%. the president -- >> no, he did not say that. >> let me finish. the president subsequently said we can meet them halfway, and boehner did not rule out a 37% number. >> no, he briefly didn't rule it out, and then he ruled it out. >> it's still on the tab
companies and some countries. >> do you plan to stay in washington? >> it depends on what kind of business i can acquire. i have a beautiful wife and i want to spend more time with him and get my golf handicap down to single digits. >> have you thought about the preservation of your papers? what will you do with all that? >> i am sending most of it to indiana university. especially the autism information. i have -- the indiana historical society will get some of my papers. i hope they find a good use for them. >> when you look back over 31 years which went by very quickly, what were the best years? >> oh, gosh, there was good in all of them. the best years from my standpoint was when i was chairman. even the people who work for me said, we felt like we were accomplishing something. we were fighting the good fight. that is one of the things i hold most dear. we were able to put on the gloves, grabbed the sword, and fight for the things we thought was right. >> thank you for spending time with this reflecting back on your ears in washington. -- years in washington. >> we are asking business ow
: it was founded to promote liberty and economic freedom, starting in san francisco, and then move into washington, d.c. milton friedman admitted the kindle institute has never sold out. we still work for liberty and freedom. i've been working with the cato institute since 1995 and full time since 2007. host: mary, fort washington, maryland. democrat. caller: i would suggest thinking that if you follow all of the problems come at the end of the trail you will find the smiling grin of greed. that is what i think caused it. for myself, naca program helped us, taking us out of the ugly arm. my mortgage is $964 a month, which will allow us to stay in our home comfortably. guest: people blame things like a financial crisis on greed, but greed is not changing. it has been with us for hundreds of thousands of years. people are greedy naturally. if we design institutions assuming people are altruistic, we will get hurt. we have to assume they are greedy, and if there altruistic, we will only benefit from that. we assume that people want to live in their own home, and give people a choice, buying or rentin
things done in washington than playing politics. i think to recognize there's been real progress made, right the border is safer today, the immigration system is better, the two parties worked together to do that over the last few years. there are still some meaningful things that need to get done. the d.r.e.a.m. act, we have to fix the low-end and high-end visa system. the mexicans are going to do a whole boar border system. i think there will be a lot of room to work together next year to get something meaningful done. if the republicans are earnest and play it straight i think they'll get a lot of credit for working with the democrats to fix the broken immigration system and making it better. jon: getting something meaningful done, it seems like a longtime since that's happened in washington. we'll look forward to it. simon rosenberg. kate obenshane thank you much. jenna: the nato alliance warning the assad regime in syria against using chemical weapons against his own people. this is an attempt to for once and for all crush the 21-month rebellion there. nato is considering a turki
. it is a process -- people think of a filibuster in "mr. smith goes to washington." i think we should have those rules in place to change it so mr. smith stays on the floor during the filibuster. it does not just run time against the senate. it does not make any sense. if somebody feels strongly enough that they want to bring the senate to a halt, they should be willing to stay there on the floor and explain why, and i think it would be self- enforcing if people would be less likely to. people look at the senate and cannot work together, cannot get anything done, and one person wants their pay to be docked. >> any other reforms or tuneups? >> if somebody put a hold on it, you could not find out who did it. secret holds on nominees. once you put a hold on them, that was it. that was wrong. we have cleaned up the rules in many different ways. you would have a 60-vote threshold to do some like that. the people back home cannot understand that. they should not accept it. >> what about the lowest point? >> as part of the affordable care at, i tried to get medicaid for the expansion of medicaid, to ta
with him, we will see a new political atmosphere in washington. at this point it seems like more of the same. host: from facebook -- guest: one thing i a lot about yesterday was this is really raising the question of canada to be cut? is it politically possible in this environment to get enough republicans and democrats to support a deal that the white house wants on deficit reduction? because they been to the altar so many times on this same issue, taxes, medicare, social security, defense spending, you must wonder, if there's any agreement possible. host: first, commented today from the senate republican leader mitch mcconnell, who will join his colleagues later today at the white house. [video clip] >> i told the president last night we would be happy to look at whatever he proposes. the truth is we are coming up against a hard deadline. as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. republicans are not about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats before or just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that would not be fair to the ame
to be in charge the coverage was there. i am not sure a lot of that registered in washington intelligence community where we had a different sense of the soviet leadership we were acquiring as we went through the dialogue it became difficult to look what we were getting from the intelligence side and what we received across the table but in geneva as president reagan met gorbachev the first time the two of them met in front of a fireplace conversation later walking along the lake and began to see the emergence where people accept and believe in president reagan's view of the role of nuclear weapons, very real distasteful. the key documents that emerged from geneva besides agreements later, the key document, the joint statement at the beginning, two leaders agree nuclear war can never be won and must never be fought. there were negotiations going on at the time, negotiations going on in geneva but they began to take their lead from the summit discussions. we were not able easily to get to the washington summit. kept running into bilateral issues in which one of our correspondents was picke
a hand. [applause] since he came to washington with president obama in 2009, he has been a forward thinking and caring supporter of the district. to the teachers and principals of this city in this country. he has helped secure millions of dollars in funding. they helped shape innovative policies, all across the country. he is a true leader, not just in time for celebration, but in times of tragedy and sorrow. yesterday, he attended the funeral of the principle of sandy hook elementary school that lost her life protecting the children of the school. ladies and gentlemen, i am proud, thankful, and privileged to introduce arne duncan. [applause] >> i want to thank the children for their fantastic support. please give a round of applause for the work she is doing. [applause] i think she is an amazing leader, and d.c. has come a long way and has a long way to go. with her passion in her heart, she is leading the charge. this is a bittersweet day. i think it is so important on days like this and every day, that we listen to our children. savor their innocence and applaud their unquencha
the government. they like to see themselves as outsiders who are only in washington because they want to destroy washington. so mostly when you hear rhetoric like that from the right, it is ideological posturing. if it were a real governing philosophy of the republican party, the government would not always get larger under republican presidents the way it does. but there is one part of government where that sort of attitude, the get it down to the size where you can drown it in the bathtub attitude is not just empty right-ring branding and hyperbole. there is one part of governance at the federal level where the conservative movement has actually succeeded in making government small enough to drown it in the bathroom at home that part of governance still technically exists, but they have hollowed it out and sucked the life out of it. they have made so it weak, it cannot properly function, and nobody expects it to. and you can tell what part of governance they have done this to with one simple test. find any other federal agency in the united states government when on the day that the president
this morning on "washington journal." guest: this is a recession between christmas and new year's. i do not know. maybe they should finish their work. you will see some push in the next few days to get a small deal done. viewers are fan of the process. anything that gets done needs to be done quickly before new year's to be signed into law. today is the 27. and so you have a few days left for lawmakers to make a deal. the president's should land at some point. there is a 5 hour time difference. they have to figure out something. it seems likely will go over the cliff. it has been looking like that before the holiday, but certainly now, particularly if you remember for congress broke for the christmas break, speaker raynor was not able to get the backup plan through his caucus, so there was no pressure on democrats to try to counter that immediately. senate democrats saying we passed a bill that raises tax rates on incomes over $250,000, we ran on this and this is what we are offering. house republicans were saying, no, we want to negotiate something, figure it out and send it to us. som
a wonderful monday. i'm brook baldwin at the cnn headquarters in atlanta. let's go to washington with wolf blitzer. "the situation room" begins right now. >>> brook, thanks very much. happening now, the president of the united states steps into a very intense political fight in michigan and he's definitely taking sides. we're also looking into what's behind the dramatically lower prices showing up at gas stations near you. and life-saving television. we have an amazing look at an underground tv channel run by rebel fighters in one of the most dangerous cities in the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin with president obama getting into a new fight with republicans and it's a fight he may actually lose. this afternoon in detroit, the president blasted a package of anti-union bills. michigan republicans, governor, is ush pushing through his state's legislature. >> what we shouldn't do, i just got to say this, what we shouldn't be doing is trying to take away your rights to bargain for better wages and working conditions. >> even though the cheering went on fo
bureaucracy in washington that this report has clearly revealed. why for a civil have made toward the longstanding recommendation of the government accountability office that the department perform a strategic review that they carry at the necessary security measures that the diplomats abroad and ensure that all necessary actions are present to prevent a recurrence. i know there will be an attempt to shift the responsibility for the tragedy to a shortage of resources. requests for more money are a familiar refrain in the state department reports. but budgetary constraints or not a factor in the department's failure to recognize the threats and adequately respond to this situation in benghazi that is and about misplaced priorities. if this department intends to blame its long string of failures on an adequate funding, then perhaps it should take a closer look at the money that is being lavished on the global climate change, colin marie diplomacy programs another fever project. this money could have been used for providing diplomatic security including hiring additional personnel an
retirement benefits imaginable, they have come here to washington, d.c., to tell congress that we should cut social security benefits for disabled veterans, raise taxes on low-income workers. so let me just tell you what some call a tweak would do. in terms of the chained c.p.i., more than 3.2 million disabled veterans receive disability compensation from the veterans administration. 3.2 million veterans, they would see a reduction, a significant reduction in their benefits. under the chained c.p.i., a disabled veteran who started receiving v.a. disability benefits at age 30 would have their benefits cut by more than $1,400 at age 45, $2,300 at age 55 and $3,200 at age 65. does anybody in their right mind think that the american people want to see benefits cut for men and women who sacrificed, who lost limbs defending their country? are we going to balance the budget on their backs? i challenge anyone who supports a chained c.p.i. to go to walter reed hospital, visit with the men and women who have lost their legs, lost their arms, lost their eyesight as a result of their service in afghanis
thinkin a budget.d... well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future... of these programs into a last minute budget deal... we'll all pay the price. aarp is fighting to protect seniors with responsible... solutions that strengthen medicare and... social security for generations to come. we can do better than a last minute deal... that would hurt all of us. megyn: a controversial report. google is accused of avoiding $2 billion in income taxes in 2011 by moving -- by sifting $9.8 billion into scene offshore shell company in bermuda. now people are questioning barack obama relationship with a google executive. joining me now, stuart varney. thank you for being here. wait a minute. ex ceo snow, the google chairman. >> reporter: he is the executive chairman now. for 10 years he was the chief executive officer. he ran google. during his running of google google parked this $9.8 billion in bermuda, thereby avoiding the heavy tax that would have had to have been paid -- if $10 billion had been brought back to america. megyn:
plus, your e-mails, phone calls and tweets. washington journal, live tuesday, at 7:00 a.m. eastern, on c-span. >> now, latinos and the 2012 election, and what policy issues influenced their vote. speakers included former white house adviser to latin american, soto, and alfonso aguilar.: this is about two hours. [inaudible conversations] s. >> this is i think, as you all know, a place where public policy and research meet. i bring together the world of ideas with the world of policy action. very happy that tim johnson, the director of the latin american program is here this morning. and also want to acknowledge sal low star who had a lot to do with the planning, and this is an event we're cosponsoring with immigration works, to tamar a jacoby, and arizona state university, working on the issues. i want to acknowledge cardenas, a former governor and distinguished mexican colleague and many other good friends. and mane others back at the woodrow wilson system. and dan, who is out of government and into this civilian life. there's no doubt the latino vote was important in this past ele
in my apartment here in washington, d.c., proudly i do. i would encourage support of this and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. waxman: mr. speaker, we have no further requests for speakers on our side of the aisle to support this legislation. i know almost all democrats that i've talked to think it's a good bill. i've urged the others to join with them in supporting it. i think it's a worthwhile piece of legislation. it's a small step but it's a step in the right direction and it will clarify some issues that still need to be clarified. so let's get this done and in pursuit of that objective, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. whitfield: i also want to urge everybody to support h.r. 6582, the small, modest energy efficiency bill, that will save some jobs. certainly want to thank the members of the senate,
affairs committee chairman ed royce. please join me in welcoming him to f.d.d.'s washington forum. >> let me thank mark here and thank the foundation for the defense of democracies. what i want to express is my appreciation as a member of the house for the work that you do, for the work product that you provide us, i can say i only wish we had deployed that more decisively sooner, but in terms of what you do, in terms of the analysis that you provide, in terms of the communication, the ability to communicate that to members of the senate and the house, i have to say it's the whole package and it is very important work. and i think if i could share one thought in particular is your work on sanctions emenergy sanctions that i think is critical. and i want to say congratulations. i saw director woolsey when i came in and i appreciate the briefings we have received from him and the ability to get the type of analysis also from cliff and mark and the whole f.d.d. team. it's so helpful. if you were to ask me, what is going to be the focal point, what's the main concern we have, i think it has b
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

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